Placenames, Landmarks & Namesakes

IRELAND

Placename, Landmark, Namesake Location – Details
Ballycorrigan County Tipperary, Republic of Ireland
Inniscorrig Dalkey, County Dublin, Republic of Ireland

CANADA

Placename, Landmark, Namesake Location – Details
Corrigan Street Gander, Newfoundland & Labrador
Corrigan Road Queen’s County, Prince Edward Island
Corrigan Crescent Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
Corrigan Street St Foy, Quebec
Chemin Corrigan Val-des-monts, Quebec
Chemin Corrigan Maniwaki, Quebec
Corrigan Street Rigaud, Quebec
Corrigan Street Kingston, Ontario
Corrigan Drive Mississauga, Ontario
Corrigan Hill Road Peterborough, Ontario
Corrigan Crescent Peterborough, Ontario
Corrigan Close Toronto, Ontario
Corrigan Road Frankford, Ontario
Corrigan Creek Thunder Bay, Ontario
Lake Corrigan Pontiac Township, Quebec, Canada

AUSTRALIA

Placename, Landmark, Namesake Location – Details
Corrigan Road Melbourne, Australia

BRITTANY – CORNWALL

Placename, Landmark, Namesake Location – Details
Corrigans – Korrigans Fairies

ENGLAND

Placename, Landmark, Namesake Location – Details
Corrigan Close London, England

UNITED STATES of AMERICA

Placename, Landmark, Namesake Location – Details
Corriganville, California Corriganville Ranch ,Chatsworth, Ventura County, Santa Susana Mountains, California
Corrigan, Texas Polk County, Texas
Corrigan Reef Cedar Key, Florida
Tracking Corrigan – The Wrong Way Sea Turtle Seaworld California
Secret Agent Corrigan Comic Strip
Jimmy Corrigan – The Smartest Kid on Earth Comic Strip
Corrigan-class Destroyer United Star Ship of the United Federation of Planets
Corrigan Avenue Meriden, Connecticut
Corrigan Way Washoe County, Nevada
Corrigan Court Charlotte, North Carolina
Corrigan Drive Bethel Park, Pennsylvania
Corrigan Road Keysborough,
Corrigan Road Portage County, Wisconsin
Corrigan Drive South Park, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Corrigan Street Gorham, New Hampshire
Corrigan Drive Fremont, Alamedo County, California
Corrigan Avenue Dallas, Texas
Corrigan Avenue Pine Beach, New Jersey
Corrigan Road Otis Orchards, Washington
Corrigan Avenue Bayville, California
Douglas Corrigan Way Salt Lake City, Utah
Corrigan Lake Oakridge, Diamond Peak, Oregon
Corrigan Lake Finney County, Kansas

 

IRELAND

Placename, Landmark, Namesake Location – Details
Ballycorrigan County Tipperary, Republic of Ireland
Inniscorrig Dalkey, County Dublin, Republic of Ireland

Ballycorrigan
Location:  County Tipperary, Republic of Ireland
Civil Parish:  Templeachally                   Poor Law Union:  Nenagh
Roman Catholic Parish:  Ballina

There are 60,462 townlands in Ireland.  An example would be:  Ballycorrigan, County: Tipperary, Civil Parish: Templeachally, Poor Law Union: Nenagh.  Indicating that a leading Corrigan family was seated there not later than the middle of the 17th century.

Ballycorrigan is a townland which lies in Ballina Roman Catholic parish.  Townlands are district territorial units.  Parts of an individual townland may lie in different civil parishes and, accordingly may be (but not necessarily so) in different Roman Catholic parishes.  The same townland names can be found in different parishes and counties e.g. there are 4 Curraheens and 8 Newtowns in Tipperary North.  Parishes were created in the 12th Century, and are made up of Townlands.  The parish (sometimes referred to as the pre-reformation parish or the civil parish) was an administrative unit.

There is no exact translation or meaning of Ballycorrigan but Bally means: Baile is usually anglicised as ‘Bally’ or ‘Baill’ and is by for the most common settlement term in Irish Placenames.  It is generally assumed to denote ‘townland’ or ‘town’ (the latter both in the nuclear sense and in the sense of townland), and is most reasonably translated in these terms e.g. Ballynafeigh, Baile na Faiche ‘Townland of the green’.  Therefore, Ballycorrigan would tanslate as ‘Townland of the Corrigans’.

 

 

Inniscorrig
Location:  Dalkey, County Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Civil Parish:  Dalkey     Poor Law Union:  Rathdown

Sir Dominic Corrigan retired from active politics in 1873 and began to spend more time at the magnificent country residence which he had built on Coliemore Road in Dalkey, Co. Dublin, on the coast south of Dublin.  The Tudor-style house, which he called Inniscorrig, was erected right on the shore, with its own private slip-way.

Inniscorrig was built in 1844 by Sir Dominic Corrigan as a private retreat. He lived in Merrion Square and was a renowned heart surgeon. He became a physician to the Royal family which was very unusual given his catholic background. He was a member of parliament for the city of Dublin and hugely influential in his medical profession. From 1859 he was elected five times as President of the Kings College of Physicians, an unprecedented honour. He was created a Barronette in 1866. King Edward VII and King George V came to Dublin on many occasions to visit him, often staying at Inniscorrig. Their visits are well documented; in fact the plasterwork in the hallway and main living room was installed to commemorate their visits, in addition to the external stonework.

The kitchen wing and the tower were added later in 1890 by Harvey Du Cros, who at the time, had paid £3 million for the Dunlop tyre patent, which at that time was an enormous amount.

The harbour and associated works were all added between 1844 and 1890 by both owners, and currently remain the largest private harbour on the east coast of Ireland.

A large conservatory behind the arches was removed after it was severely damaged by a stray World War II mine which found its way up the channel detonating on a rock in Dalkey Sound. This explosion blew out all the windows in the area and the Turner conservatory had to be removed some years later. There is much more that can be read on the history of Inniscorrig.

 

 

 

CANADA

Placename, Landmark, Namesake Location – Details
Corrigan Street Gander, Newfoundland & Labrador
Corrigan Road Queen’s County, Prince Edward Island
Corrigan Crescent Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
Corrigan Street St Foy, Quebec
Chemin Corrigan Val-des-monts, Quebec
Chemin Corrigan Maniwaki, Quebec
Corrigan Street Rigaud, Quebec
Corrigan Street Kingston, Ontario
Corrigan Drive Mississauga, Ontario
Corrigan Hill Road Peterborough, Ontario
Corrigan Crescent Peterborough, Ontario
Corrigan Close Toronto, Ontario
Corrigan Road Frankford, Ontario
Corrigan Creek Thunder Bay, Ontario
Lake Corrigan Pontiac Township, Quebec, Canada

 

BRITTANY – CORNWALL

Placename, Landmark, Namesake Location – Details
Corrigans – Korrigans Fairies

Corrigans/Korrigans Fairies

Land of Origin: Brittany (France)
Other Origins: Cornwall (England)
Other Names: Korrigans
Element: Water
Appearance and Temperament
This changeable faery came to Cornwall from Breton France, where she is still well known. Corrigans appear as blonde females by night and repulsive hags by day.
Time Most Active: All year
Lore
The Corrigan may be a devalued version of the Celtic Triple goddess known as the Morrigan, who is three Crone Goddesses in one. Or she may be a myth which underscores the devaluation of women, especially elderly women.

Men who see her by night are never able to forget her, and some pine away for want of her. Stories exist concerning men who marry a Corrigan only to discover in the morning the true nature of their wives. Other legends state that if a man genuinely loves her in her night form and is open-minded enough to continue loving her in the morning, that she will become human and remain beautiful both night and day.

Where to Find Them: Probably in woodlands near running water.
How to Contact: Unknown.
Magical and Ritual Help: Undetermined.

Source:  http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/4611/fairyC.html#Corrigans

Types of Faeries

Who or what are faeries? There are many different types of fairies and they have just as many personalities. They live in all kinds of places, so be sure to know your faeries just in case you happen to run across one. You would sure want to know how to interact with one because you do not want to become the victim of a Faerie prank!

Funk & Wagnall’s Multimedia Encyclopedia

A diminutive supernatural creature, generally in human form, dwelling in an imaginary region called fairyland; and the stories of its interventions through magic in mortal affairs. The term fairy is also loosely applied to such beings as brownies, gnomes, elves, nixies, goblins, trolls, dwarfs, pixies, kobolds, banshees, sylphs, sprites, and undines. The folk imagination not only conceives of fairyland as a distinct domain, but also imagines fairies as living in everyday surroundings such as hills, trees, and streams and sees fairy rings, fairy tables, and fairy steeds in natural objects. The belief in fairies was an almost universal attribute of early folk culture. In ancient Greek literature, the sirens in Homer’s Odyssey are fairies, and a number of the heroes in his Iliad have fairy lovers in the form of nymphs. The Gandharvas (celestial singers and musicians), who figure in Sanskrit poetry, were fairies, as were the Hathors, or female genii, of ancient Egypt, who appeared at the birth of a child and predicted the child’s future.”

Encyclopedia Britannica

Also spelled faerie or faery, a mythical being of folklore and romance usually having magic powers and dwelling on earth in close relationship with humans. It can appear as a dwarf creature typically having green clothes and hair, living underground or in stone heaps, and characteristically exercising magic powers to benevolent ends; as a diminutive sprite commonly in the shape of a delicate, beautiful, ageless winged woman dressed in diaphanous white clothing, inhabiting fairyland, but making usually well-intentioned intervention in personal human affairs; or as a tiny, mischievous, and protective creature generally associated with a household hearth.

In ancient Greek literature, the sirens in Homer’s Odyssey are fairies, and a number of the heroes in his Iliad have fairy lovers in the form of nymphs.

The Gandharvas (celestial singers and musicians), who figure in Sanskrit poetry, were fairies, as were the Hathors, or female genii, of ancient Egypt, who appeared at the birth of a child and predicted the child’s future.

 

 

ENGLAND

Placename, Landmark, Namesake Location – Details
Corrigan Close London, England

 

 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Placename, Landmark, Namesake Location – Details
Corriganville, California Corriganville Ranch ,Chatsworth, Ventura County, Santa Susana Mountains, California
Corrigan, Texas Polk County, Texas
Corrigan Avenue Meriden, Connecticut
Corrigan Way Washoe County, Nevada
Corrigan Court Charlotte, North Carolina
Corrigan Drive Bethel Park, Pennsylvania
Corrigan Road Keysborough,
Corrigan Road Portage County, Wisconsin
Corrigan Drive South Park, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Corrigan Street Gorham, New Hampshire
Corrigan Drive Fremont, Alamedo County, California
Corrigan Avenue Dallas, Texas
Corrigan Avenue Pine Beach, New Jersey
Corrigan Road Otis Orchards, Washington
Corrigan Avenue Bayville, California
Douglas Corrigan Way Salt Lake City, Utah
Corrigan Lake Oakridge, Diamond Peak, Oregon
Corrigan Lake Finney County, Kansas
Corrigan Reef Cedar Key, Florida
Tracking Corrigan – The Wrong Way Sea Turtle Seaworld California
Secret Agent Corrigan Comic Strip
Jimmy Corrigan – The Smartest Kid on Earth Comic Strip
Corrigan-class Destroyer United Star Ship of the United Federation of Planets

Corriganville
Corriganville Ranch was near Chatsworth, Ventura County in the Santa Susana Mountains in California it was a 1,611 acre western style town and film studio  built by Raymond ‘Crash’ Corrigan in 1937.  The name was changed to Hope Town in 1965 when comedian Bob Hope purchased the property.

Corriganville Park was purchased by Ray “Crash” Corrigan in 1937 for $11,354. This actor/cowboy/ stuntman fittingly named the property Corriganville and decided that the beautiful rocky landscape was the perfect setting for the filming of movies, especially westerns.

Movie Ranch – The development of the property as a private outdoor set could not have come at a better time as Hollywood was flooding the movie market with inexpensive “shoot-em-up” westerns. During this period, roads were developed, utilities were installed, wells were dug, trees were removed, a lake was formed, rock outcroppings were enhanced, and sets were constructed in and around the lowland areas to facilitate filming operations. Throughout the 1940’s and 1950’s, there were hundreds of movies made using this dramatic scene. Corriganville became the outdoor setting for many TV western series.

Amusement Park – In 1949, Corrigan converted the property into a commercial venture by developing a western amusement park that was open to the public. The park featured stuntmen shows, movie lots, a working western town, Indian crafts, stagecoach rides, pony rides, and boating on a lake. During its heyday, the park attracted as many as 20,000 people on weekends and was rated among the top ten amusement parks in the United States.

Sale and Closure – Corriganville was purchased by Bob Hope in 1965 as part of a 1,400-acre land acquisition and was closed to the public a year later. A fire in 1970 caused extensive destruction to most of the movie sets and buildings.

Renewed Interest – In 1988, 190 acres of land comprising the principal working areas of the original Corriganville Ranch were purchased by the City of Simi Valley for use as a Regional Park. This area soon became the focus of regional historical preservation efforts. In order to preserve the unique open-space character of the area while at the same time providing for
regional and local recreational needs, the Rancho Simi Open Space Conservation Agency (RSOSCA) initiated preparation of a Master Plan Report in May 1988. The Plan establishes critical park guidelines which permit recreational uses while preserving and enhancing the fragile natural environment. It was at this time that the Corriganville Preservation Committee became active.

www.corriganville.com

 

CorriganTexas 
CORRIGAN, TEXAS (Bee County). Corrigan (Corrigan Settlement), six miles east of Skidmore on Aransas Creek in southern Bee County, was established in 1835 by Irish immigrants and received its name some thirteen years later. The community’s earliest settlers included James O’Reilly and Jeremiah O’Toole; O’Toole had moved from Ireland to New York in 1825. In 1826, with hopes of obtaining land from the Mexican government (see MEXICAN TEXAS), O’Toole and O’Reilly visited the area on Aransas Creek.  After returning to New York, O’Toole took his family aboard the New Packet, which arrived in Texas in 1829. Five years later he acquired 12,000 acres on Aransas Creek. In 1835 the family built a home at a site on the San Patricio-La Bahía road. The area’s early settlers attempted ranching but were hindered in their efforts and sometimes forced to flee in the face of Indian attacks and raiding Mexicans. When O’Toole’s daughter, Ellen, married Irish immigrant John Corrigan in 1848, the couple built their home on O’Toole’s land, and the hamlet that developed was subsequently named Corrigan Settlement. In 1871 Ellen (O’Toole) Corrigan and her brother Martin O’Toole transferred to the bishop of Galveston several acres for a Catholic church and cemetery; the Sacred Heart of Jesus Church and the Campo Santo cemetery were constructed at the site. In 1898 the settlement had a school with one teacher and ten students. By 1936 the community had four or five scattered dwellings. The cemetery, marked by a state historical marker, remained in 1990, when several families resided on nearby lands. At that time the area was still referred to as Corrigan.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Grace Bauer, Bee County Centennial, 1858-1958 (Bee County Centennial, 1958). Camp Ezell, Historical Story of Bee County, Texas (Beeville: Beeville Publishing, 1973).  Rachel Bluntzer Hébert, The Forgotten Colony: San Patricio de Hibernia (Burnet, Texas: Eakin Press, 1981). St. Joseph’s Catholic Church: 50th Anniversary, 1927-1977 (Beeville, Texas, 1978?).
Adrian D. Ramirez

CORRIGAN, TEXAS (Polk County). Corrigan is at the junction of U.S. highways 59 and 287 and Farm roads 352 and 942, about 100 miles north of Houston in north central Polk County. Although for several years a few sawmills and farms had been established in the area, the real impetus for community settlement came in 1881, when the Houston, East and West Texas Railway was completed through northern Polk County. The town was named for Pat Corrigan, conductor of the first train through the newly developed site. In 1882 the Trinity and Sabine Railway was also built through the town.  Lumber companies, drawn by the good rail connections and huge pine forests, greatly expanded their operations in the Corrigan vicinity; in 1881-82, for example, seventeen sawmills, including the Allen and Williams mill, operated nearby. As the mills continued  production, churches and a variety of businesses, including hotels, stores, and gins, opened at Corrigan. A post office opened at the community in 1883; nine years later the Corrigan Index, the first of several newspapers to be published there, printed its first issue. The local economy was diversified by a bottle works, stone quarries, sand pits, and continued agricultural production (especially of cotton, tomatoes, poultry, stock, and dairy products). This diversity allowed Corrigan to withstand periodic depressions in the lumber industry, like the one that closed area sawmills between 1904 and 1907.  Timber nonetheless remained the mainstay of the town’s economic and social structure. Particleboard plants and the Edens and Burch sawmill, leased by the Corrigan Lumber Company in 1946, proved particularly important. The weekly Corrigan Times, begun in 1953, continued to publish in the 1980s. The town’s population, which numbered 461 in 1900, grew to 1,420 in the early 1950s before declining to 986 by 1960. Subsequent growth, however, nearly doubled the population by 1985, when some 1,770 persons lived in the incorporated town. In 1991 the population of Corrigan was reported as 1,816, with sixty-one businesses.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Hamilton Pratt Easton, History of the Texas Lumbering Industry (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas, 1947).  A Pictorial History of Polk County, Texas, 1846-1910 (Livingston, Texas: Polk County Bicentennial Commission, 1976; rev. ed. 1978).
Robert Wooster

Corrigan Texas Location, Polk County

 

CORRIGAN REEF

 

 

A long sandy reef running offshore in a southeastward direction for about two miles and located 2 miles east of Cedar Key, Florida, Corrigan Reef marks the northwestern edge of Waccasassa Bay. Trout, redfish, flounder, and sheepshead can be found in the deep cuts in the reef, but use caution when approaching at low tide. Jig the holes and cuts or drift live bait such as shrimp, pinfish, mud minnows or finger mullet under a float or free-lined. Also watch for tailing redfish along the edges of the reef. These are great targets for gold spoons and flies. Bird activity at the tip of the reef during warm weather marks schools of bluefish, jack crevalle and Spanish mackerel feeding on baitfish. Jigs and spoons will catch them, but a trace of wire leader might be needed to prevent cut-offs.

 

 

Tracking Corrigan
The Wrong Way Sea Turtle

                        

            Dr. Scott Eckert from the Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute followed the first male green sea turtle to be tracked.  The turtle’s name is Corrigan.  After taking a wrong turn in the fall of 1996, he is now back on course, thanks to all the people who did a good turn for the turtle, and saved his life.  Corrigan is a male eastern Pacific green sea turtle who swam too far north last October, and ended up in Alaska.

After recovering at Sea World, he was reintroduced to the ocean on July 11, 1997.  Corrigan has a transmitter glued to his shell.  The transmitter sends a radio signal up to a satellite.  Scientists can follow his signal, and learn more about sea turtles.

Corrigan was a Long, Wrong, Way from Home……

Corrigan’s story began in Alaska On October 8, 1996.  Two men found a 140-pound sea turtle floating near Montague Island in Prince William Sound, Alaska.  The turtle was so cold it wasn’t moving and the men thought it was dead.  But when they put it into their boat, it started to move.  The men quickly contacted officials from the National Marine Fisheries Services.

These biologists knew the male sea turtle was a long way from home.  The ocean water temperature in Alaska was only about 37 degrees Fahrenheit.  That is much too cold for a warm-water reptile.  Green sea turtles are normally found in water that is at least 65 degrees Fahrenheit.  Since sea turtles are so rare in Alaska these biologists also knew they needed advice from an expert.  The called Dr. Scott Eckert, a sea turtle biologist from the Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute in San Diego, California.

Dr. Eckert, and the animal care experts at Sea World were ready to help.  Sea World helps many stranded animals, including sea turtles, sea lions, birds, and even whales.  With their advice, volunteers and fisheries service biologists slowly warmed the turtle until he could be placed on an Alaska Airlines flight to San Diego.

On October, 1996 the sea turtle flew to San Diego stopping once in Seattle, a total of 3874 kilometres (2,407.26 miles).  As soon as he arrived, Dr. Echert, and the Sea World veterinarians examined him.  Hospital tests showed that he hadn’t eaten for two months and was 30 pounds underweight.  “It’s a good thing this turtle was found” said Dr. Echert.  “He could not have lived another two weeks in Alaska.”

Care at Sea World……

At Sea World, the sea turtle was kept in a warm salt water aquarium and fed fish, squid, shrimp, vitamins, and minerals every day.  Although as adults, slow-moving green sea turtles are mostly vegetarians, they eagerly eat fish, and invertebrates when they can find them easily.

The turtle was named “Wrong Way Corrigan” after the famous wrong-way pilot Douglas Corrigan (1907-1995).  Douglas Corrigan left New York on July 17, 1938 heading for Los Angeles in a rickety aeroplane.  With a broken compass, Corrigan tried to fly west but instead flew east, and landed safely near Dublin, Ireland.

The sea turtle Corrigan was just lucky.  Instead of losing his life in Alaska, he spent the winter of 1996-97 at Sea World.  As winter passed, Corrigan kept eating and growing.  During his nine month stay at Sea World, and the Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute, he gained 40 pounds.  By March, Corrigan was healthy enough to be reintroduced, but the ocean water in San Diego was still in the low 60 degrees Fahrenheit range, too cold for a recovering sea turtle.

In July, as the water off San Diego warmed up to over 70 degrees, plans were made to reintroduce Corrigan to the ocean.  A satellite transmitter was glued to the turtle’s shell.  “No one has ever followed a male green sea turtle by satellite before,” Dr. Eckert explains.  “After they hatch from the egg, male sea turtles never again return to the shore.  Until now, scientists have only been able to tag and follow female sea turtles, who come ashore to lay eggs.  This a very exciting project.  We all wish Corrigan well.”

Eastern Pacific green sea turtles live in warm ocean waters along the west coasts of North and South America, from California to Ecuador.  As adults they are vegetarians.  They eat grasses and algaes.  Green sea turtles are an endangered species.

Last reported location……

The last transmission from Corrigan was on September 28, 1997.  It is likely that Corrigan is alive and well.  The transmitter may have fallen off or been knocked off.  It is possible that Corrigan was eaten by a predator.  We may never know.  The last information that Dr. Eckert collected indicated that Corrigan was making some deeper dives than usual, some up to 66 meters (216 feet).  When last heard from, Corrigan was 920 kilometres (571.66 miles) from the coast of Oregon.  Corrigan swam 2,470 kilometres (1,534.78 miles) in just over two months time.

(Permission of/Copyright  Sea World, Inc. 1997, webpage)

 

 


Secret Agent Corrigan
Created as King Features answer to Dick Tracy, Secret Agent X-9 premiered in newspapers on January 22, 1934. Originally written by Dashiell Hammett and drawn by legendary artist Alex Raymond, a number of artists have illustrated the feature over the years. Most notably, Austin Briggs, Al Williamson and George Evans.
It was during Williamson’s tenure, with Archie Goodman at the helm writing, that the strip was officially changed from Secret Agent X-9 to Secret Agent Corrigan.This was done for promotional reasons in order to sell the strip as a “new” feature to newspaper clients.
Discouraged by the modest returns payed by King Features,Williamson called it quits after thirteen years on the strip. He referred friend and colleague George Evans for the position. Evans first daily hit newspapers on February 4, 1980. Evans continued on the strip for the next sixteen years. Maurice Horn lamented on King Feature’s apathy in promoting the strip in his book, “100 Years of American Newpaper Comics”:
“It is unfortunate that because of (Secret Agent Corrigan’s) limited circulation, few people are able to read and appreciate one of the genuinely interesting action strips still extant, a strip carried on in dashing style by Evans.”
Upon Evans’ retirement from the strip in 1996, King Features discontinued the strip. The last daily was February 10, 1996.

 

Jimmy Corrigan, The Smartest Kid on Earth


The best-known comic book character in the world is Superman. It makes a kind of sense then for the Man of Steel to make a cameo appearance at the beginning of Chris Ware’s brilliant graphic novel Jimmy Corrigan. As Jimmy watches from his office window in downtown Chicago a man dressed as Superman jumps from the top of a neighbouring building and falls to his death. There are no superheroes in Jimmy Corrigan’s world.
The hero of Ware’s story is neither a kid nor very smart, but rather a “lonely, emotionally-impaired human castaway.” His place of employment is a cubicle, the Dilbert prop that has become our favourite metaphor for contemporary isolation and anomie. He seems to be only in his thirties but already looks like an old man. At least once a day he phones his mom.
The story is concerned with Jimmy’s attempt to understand the secret past that has been riding him like a genetic ghost all his life. It begins with his receiving a letter from the father he never knew asking him to come visit him in Michigan. When he gets there he is introduced to a family history that includes an adopted sister and a grandfather, also named Jimmy Corrigan, whose story is told at length in flashback.
Grandfather Jimmy is another human castaway, having been abandoned by his father during a trip to the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. The Fair’s White City is the symbolic center of the novel – an unreal, artificial world that is both indifferent and cruel. Its image becomes the novel’s theme.
Jimmy Corrigan isn’t for kids, and it certainly isn’t meant to be fun. The tone throughout is one of unrelieved loneliness and depression. Crutches and walkers symbolize emotional disabilities. Personal relations are only forged with great effort, and always end in pain. In a dream sequence Jimmy imagines that he has become a metal man so that he can’t be hurt by human contact. Joy, even the joy of a child, can’t penetrate the envelope. The only time we see either Jimmy smile is when Jimmy Sr. is played for a fool by a school mate who later takes the opportunity to humiliate him.
The art of Jimmy Corrigan, its dull colouring and smoothly vacant backgrounds, provides a perfect complement to the novel’s melancholy. The figures are drawn with thick black outlines that emphasize their separation from a geometrically pure and inhuman world (cubicles, clapboard rooming houses, the White City). The faces of secondary characters remain hidden, turned away or concealed behind body parts, thus increasing our sense of isolation. And even Jimmy is an alienating site. His old-fashioned clothes exaggerate his prematurely aged physique while his eyes look like a couple of milky pinholes punched into a saggy lump of pink clay. It is as though Ware is daring us to walk away.
It is an amazing book, with perhaps the most amazing thing about it being the way Ware, writing for serial publication at the rate of two pages a week for the past seven years, manages to control such a complex visual narrative and give it the kind of shape it has. With its interest in race, history, family and identity it has something of the status of an American epic, while its cool eye and ad-art background help make it into an ironic pop statement on unpopularity. It will have to be read more than once to be appreciated fully – but most readers will find the extra time well spent.
By:  Chris Ware

 

United Federation of Planets (U.F.P.) and Starfleet Ships
U.S.S. Matalon NCC-1319 / Corrigan-class Destroyer

 

 

Ships Built from:           2120 to 2260
Subclass:                      Corrigan class-Destroyer
Ship Name:                  U.S.S. Matalon
Variant:                        N/A
Registry:                       NCC-1319

Of all the design failures of the many Starfleet designers, none have been so tragic as the Corrigan-class destroyers.  Introduced in 2212, the ten ships of this class proved spaceworthy and dependable…until seven years after the first ship was commissioned, when the dilithium articulation frame shattered and the matter/antimatter reaction ran wild.  The U.S.S. Matalon (NCC-1319) was destroyed in a matter of seconds, and all hands were lost.  Unfortunately, before the cause of the explosion was found, two more Corrigan-class ships suffered the same fate.  Ultimately, Starfleet engineers came to the conclusion that the articulation frame was prone to microfractures…but the damage was done, and Starfleet quietly retired the Corrigan-class eleven years after commissioning.

The U.S.S. Matalon (NCC-1319) was almost a third casualty of the microfracture defect in 2219, when an astute assistant engineer noticed a power fluctuation in the intermix chamber.  Immediately halting the warp reaction, the engineer forced the Matalon out of warp and almost into an unctontrolled spiral to the surface of New Lothian.  The crew managed to get the ship into a low orbit, however, and the engineer received a commendation for his quick action that saved one-hundred and forty-five lives.

Source:  www.shipschematics.net

Corrigan Shoe

• BRAND: JOSEF SEIBEL MENS
• OFFICIAL NAME: CORRIGAN
• COLOR: ALCE/ KOMBI BRASIL
• SIZE: EU 47 WHICH CONVERTS TO A US 13 – 13.5
• SUGGESTED RETAIL: $ 140

About the Shoe:

This ultra-comfortable shoe features the highest grade U.S. Prime Leather uppers.
The leather is naturally oil tanned, with vegetable dye completely through.
Hand sewn construction gives extra life, flexibility and quality.
The hand sewn upper is Double Lock Stitched, meaning it will not fray apart if you have a loose stitch.
No shank or stiff midsole.
No break in period required, meaning comfort right out of the box!
Fully leather lined.
Lightweight removable Polyurethane insole incorporates a memory and energy return system, providing superior comfort.
Polyurethane outsole is shaped to be anatomically correct to fit the shape of your foot, providing arch support.
Superb flexibility to go along with great shock absorption.
Classic “European Fit” is snug in the instep and heel and roomy in the toe box.

About the Brand:

It all started back in 1886, when Carl-August Seibel founded one of the first shoe factories in Hauenstein, a small village in Germany. The small village of Hauenstein, even today, has about 5,000 inhabitants.

At that time, Mr. Seibel was making shoes and sandals, of various constructions, in his own home. In 1907 a new, big factory was built. This facility is still one of the production units today.

As years passed, the business was taken over by a third generation under Josef Seibel. The family owned company is run today by a fourth generation under Carl-August Seibel. Premium quality in our materials, the best workmanship, and comfort are the main principles that have helped Josef Seibel become known worldwide as “The European Comfort Shoe”TM.