United States of America – Corrigan’s

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

AMERICAN WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE
1775 – 1783


Revolutionary War Memorial – Valley Forge

The men and women of the Continental Army were ordinary men and women – like many of us, but these everyday men and women were thrust into extraordinary circumstances.  Valley Forge National Historical Park commemorates more than the collective sacrifices and dedication of the Revolutionary War generation, it pays homage to the ability of everyday Americans to pull together and overcome adversity during extraordinary times.

Of all the places associated with the American War for Independence, perhaps none has come to symbolize perseverance and sacrifice more than Valley Forge. The hardships of the encampment claimed the lives of one in ten, nearly all from disease. Despite the privations suffered by the army at Valley Forge, Washington and his generals built a unified professional military organization that ultimately enabled the Continental Army to triumph over the British.

Perhaps one of Washington’s soldiers said it best when he described his reasons for not abandoning the field despite the harsh conditions:  “We had engaged in the defense of our wounded country and . . . we were determined to persevere.”  Private Joseph Plumb Martin, 8th Connecticut regiment, December 1777.

On September 11, 1777 British and American troops met and fought at the Battle of Brandywine.  It was a defeat for the Revolutionary Army enabling the British to occupy Philadelphia, the American capitol.  Congress had fled to York where the seat of government was established.  Valley Forge was chosen as the location for the winter encampment of 1777 – 1778 because it was located near the main road between Philadelphia and York.  The area had natural defence barriers of Mount Joy, Mount Misery and the Schuylkill River.  On December 19, 1777 the army marched in and began to set up the encampment.  Between December and June the army would undergo reorganization and re-supply.  General von Steuben arrived during the encampment and volunteered his services to train the soldiers.  Recruits arrived to join the army as replacements for those lost due to end of enlistment, sickness, or desertion.  They also increased the ranks of the army.  Washington’s Army arrived at Valley Forge as an ill-fed, ragged and indifferently trained organization.  They left six months later with vastly improved training and logistical support as a result of the combined efforts of General Washington and his staff.  By the end of the encampment a new army emerged from Valley Forge and successfully met the highly trained and professional British Army on the field of battle at Monmouth, New Jersey.

The Valley Forge Muster Roll is dedicated to the 30,000 plus men who served at the Valley Forge Encampment under General George Washington during the period of December 1777 to June 1778.  This list provides the only known, record of all of the soldiers who served at the Valley Forge Encampment.

The information found in the Valley Forge Muster Roll was collected and analyzed from official documents located at the Valley Forge National Historical Park and the National Archives and Records Administration.  The information on this list was lovingly gathered and authenticated by dedicated personnel (staff and volunteers) working with the Valley Forge National Historic Park and volunteers from the Lockheed Martin Network of Volunteer Associates (NOVA)

The encampment at Valley Forge from December 1777 through June 1778 was comprised of six regular divisions 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, Support and Sullivan’s, which was a supplemental division. Each division was comprised of three brigades except for Sullivan’s who had one.

Muster Roll Personal ID:  PA00505
Last Name:  Corrigan First Name:  Cornelius
Rank:  Private Rank Type:  Rank and file
Brigade:  1ST PA Brigade (Commander: BG Anthony Wayne) Company:  Captain William Alexander
State:  PA (Pennsylvania) Regiment:  7-PA (Commander: COL William Irving)
Division:  2ND Division (Commander: Maj. General Thomas Mifflin) Monthly Muster Roll Status:  December 1777:  Name on roll without comment.

INDIAN WARS
1775 – 1842

In the19 century, the incessant Westward expansion of the United States incrementally compelled large numbers of Native Americans to resettle further west, sometimes by force, almost always reluctantly. Under President Andrew Jackson, Congress passed the Indian Removal Act of 1830, which authorized the President to conduct treaties to exchange Indian land east of the Mississippi River for lands west of the river. As many as 100,000 American Indians eventually relocated in the West as a result of this Indian Removal policy. In theory, relocation was supposed to be voluntary (and many Indians did remain in the East), but in practice great pressure was put on American Indian leaders to sign removal treaties. Arguably the most egregious violation of the stated intention of the removal policy was the Treaty of New Echota, which was signed by a dissident faction of Cherokees, but not the elected leadership. The treaty was brutally enforced by President Martin Van Buren, which resulted in the deaths of an estimated 4,000 Cherokees (mostly from disease) on the Trail of Tears.

Conflicts, generally known as “Indian Wars”, broke out between U.S. forces and many different tribes. U.S. government authorities entered numerous treaties during this period, but later abrogated many for various reasons. Well-known military engagements include the Native American victory at the Battle of Little Bighorn in 1876, and the massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee in 1890. On January31, 1876, the United States government ordered all remaining Native Americans to move into reservations or reserves. This, together with the near-extinction of the American Bison that many tribes had lived on, set about the downturn of Prairie Culture that had developed around the use of the horse for hunting, travel and trading.

American policy toward Native Americans has been an evolving process. In the late nineteenth century, reformers, in efforts to “civilize” Indians, adapted the practice of educating native children in Indian Boarding Schools. These schools, which were primarily run by Christians, proved traumatic to Indian children, who were forbidden to speak their native languages, taught Christianity instead of their native religions and in numerous other ways forced to abandon their Indian identity and adopt European-American culture. There are also many documented cases of sexual, physical and mental abuses occurring at these schools

CORRIGAN COMBATENT
Chalmette National Cemetery

Name CORRIGAN, JOHN State / Regiment 5 US
Section 143 Arm Infantry
Grave 12245 Death March 1, 1894
Rank Private War Indian Wars
Date / Place Enlistment N/A Monument
Company G Comments N/A

 

AMERICAN CIVIL WAR
1861-1865

The American Civil War (1861–1865) also called the Was Between the States was fought in North America between the United States of America, called the Union Forces and the Confederate States of America, a coalition of eleven southern states that declared their independence and claimed the right of secession from the Union. The war produced over 970,000 casualties (3.09% of population), including approximately 560,300 deaths (1.78%), a loss of more American lives than any other conflict in US history. The causes of the war, and even the name of the war itself, are still debated.

During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the United Staes, the twenty-four northern states that were not part of the seceding Confederacy. Since the term had been used prior to the war to refer to the entire United States (a “union of states”), using it to apply to the non-secessionist side carried a connotation of legitimacy as the continuation of the pre-existing political entity. Also, in the public dialogue of the United States, new states are “admitted to the Union” and the President’s  annual address to Congress and to the people is referred to as the “State of the Union” Address.

During the American Civil War, Loyalists to the United States living in the Border States and Confederate States were termed Unionists. Nearly 120,000 Southern Unionists served in the Union Army during the Civil War, and every Southern state, except South Carolina, raised ‘Unionists’ regiments. Southern Unionists were extensively used as anti-guerrilla forces and as occupation troops in areas of the Confederacy occupied by the Union.

Since the Civil War, the term has been a widely used synonym for the Northern side of the conflict, and has increasingly lost the more subtle historical connotations. It is usually used in contexts where “United States” might be confusing, “Federal” obscure, or “Yankee” dated or derogatory. Example uses:  Union General Ulysses S. Grant, Union Army of the Potomac, and Union cavalry. However, the term Union remains more popular with historians than it does with the general public.

The Confederate States of America—also referred to as the Confederate StatesCSAthe Confederacy and Dixie (colloquially)—was a country that existed between 1861 and 1865  in North America, comprising states that seceded from the United States of America. The territory of the CSA consisted of most of the southeastern portion of today’s United States. As its existence was contested by the United States for the whole of its brief history, there was never a definitive delineation of Confederate States’ northern boundary. Its southern land boundary was with Mexico. It was otherwise bounded by the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico.

For most of its life the Confederacy was engaged in a war of independence against the United States, with the vast majority of combat taking place in Southern territory. The Army of Northern Virginia, under General Robert E. Lee, also made limited incursions onto Union soil.

Along with the northwestern counties of Virginia (whose residents did not wish to secede and eventually entered the Union in 1863  as West Virginia), four of the five northernmost “slave states” (Maryland, Delaware, Missouri, and Kentucky) did not secede, and became known as the Border States.

Maryland had numerous pro-Confederate officials, but after rioting in Baltimore and other events had prompted a Federal declaration of martial law, Union troops moved in, and arrested the disloyal elements. Both Missouri and Kentucky remained in the Union, but factions within each state organized governments in exile that were recognized by the CSA.

In Missouri, effective secession was prevented by military intervention by the Union, while the State government under Governor Claiborne F. Jackson, a southern sympathizer, evacuated the state capital of Jefferson City and met in-exile at the town of Neosho, Missouri, adopting a secession ordinance that was recognized by the Confederacy on October 30, 1861, while the Union organized a competing State government by calling a constitutional convention that had originally been convened to vote on secession (Missouri also formed Confederate units).

Although Kentucky did not secede, for a time it declared itself neutral. During a brief occupation by the Confederate Army, Southern sympathizers organized a secession convention, inaugurated a Confederate Governor, and gained recognition from the Confederacy. However, that military occupation turned general popular opinion in Kentucky against the Confederacy, and the state subsequently reaffirmed its loyal status and expelled the Confederate government.

Residents of the northwestern counties of Virginia organized a secession from Virginia, with a plan for gradual emancipation, and entered the Union in 1863 as West Virginia. Similar secessions were supported in some other areas of the Confederacy (such as eastern Tennessee), but were suppressed by declarations of martial law by the Confederacy.

The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System is a computerized database containing very basic facts about servicemen who served on both sides during the Civil War. The initial focus of the CWSS is the Names Index Project, a project to enter names and other basic information from 6.3 million soldier records in the National Archives. The facts about the soldiers were entered from records that are indexed to many millions of other documents about Union and Confederate Civil War soldiers maintained by the National Archives and Records Administration.

Other information includes: histories of regiments in both the Union and Confederate Armies, links to descriptions of 384 significant battles of the war, and other historical information. Additional information about soldiers, sailors, regiments, and battles, as well as prisoner-of-war records and cemetery records, will be added over time.

The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System (CWSS) is a cooperative effort by the National Park Service (NPS) and several other public and private partners, to computerize information about the Civil War. The goal of the CWSS is to increase the American people’s understanding of this decisive era in American history by making information about it widely accessible. The CWSS will enable the public to make a personal link between themselves and history.

Corrigan’s Who Served With The Union And Confederate Forces

Army:                          UNION STATES
Leader:                       Abraham Lincoln
Commander:               General Ulysses S. Grant

No. Soldier Name Side Function Regiment / Company / Rank In-Out / Alternate Name / Notes
1 Corrigan, … Union Signal Corps (Regular Army)
? / Sergeant
2 Corrigan, Alfred McQuinn Union Cavalry 9th Regiment, New York Cavalry
Co. K, I / 1 Lieutenant / Major
3 Corrigan, Andrew Union Infantry 3rd Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry
Co. D / Private – Private / Andrew Carrigan
4 Corrigan, Andrew Union 20th Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps
5 Corrigan, Andrew Union Infantry 28th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry
6 Corrigan, Andrew J. Union Unassigned Veteran Reserve Corps
7 Corrigan, Anthony G Union Infantry 35th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
8 Corrigan, Anthony G. Union Infantry 79th Regiment, New York Infantry
9 Corrigan, Arthur Union Infantry 31st Regiment, New York Infantry
10 Corrigan, Arthur Union Infantry 111th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
11 Corrigan, Barnhard Union Infantry 45th Regiment, Illinois Infantry
12 Corrigan, Bernard Union Infantry 11th Regiment, New York Infantry
13 Corrigan, Cornelius Union Infantry 1st Regiment, New York Infantry
14 Corrigan, Daniel Union Infantry 10th Regiment, Connecticut Infantry
15 Corrigan, Daniel Union Artillery 3rd Regiment, US Artillery (Regular Army)
16 Corrigan, Daniel Union Artillery 1st Regiment, US Artillery (Regular Army)
17 Corrigan, Daniel Union Infantry 6th Regiment, US Infantry (Regular Army)
18 Corrigan, Daniel Union Artillery 1st Regiment, Pennsylvania Light Artillery (14th Reserves)
19 Corrigan, Daniel Union Infantry 105th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
20 Corrigan, Daniel Union Infantry 19th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry
21 Corrigan, Daniel Union Infantry 5th Regiment, Ohio Infantry
22 Corrigan, Denis Union Cavalry 11th Regiment, New York Cavalry
23 Corrigan, Dennis Union Infantry 19th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry
24 Corrigan, Dennis Union Infantry 23rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry
25 Corrigan, Edward Union Artillery 1st Regiment, Vermont Heavy Artillery
26 Corrigan, Edward Union Infantry 37th Regiment, New York Infantry
27 Corrigan, Emily Union Mississippi Marine Brigade
28 Corrigan, Francis Union Infantry 9th Regiment, New Hampshire Infantry
29 Corrigan, Francis Union Infantry 7th Regiment, Maryland Infantry
30 Corrigan, Francis Union Artillery Baltimore Battery, Maryland Light Artillery
31 Corrigan, Frank Union Infantry 2nd Regiment, New York Infantry
32 Corrigan, Franklin Union Engineers 1st Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, Michigan
33 Corrigan, Franklin Union Infantry 72nd Regiment, Illinois Infantry
34 Corrigan, Frederick Union Infantry 71st Regiment, New York Infantry
35 Corrigan, Frederick Union 2nd Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps
36 Corrigan, George Union Cavalry 7th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry
37 Corrigan, George W. Union Infantry 77th Regiment, New York Infantry
38 Corrigan, George W. Union Unidentified New York
39 Corrigan, Hugh Union Infantry 28th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
40 Corrigan, Hugh Union Infantry 23rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry
41 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 47th Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry
42 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 19th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry
43 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 28th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry
44 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 116th Regiment, Indiana Infantry (6 months, 1863-4)
45 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 13th Regiment, New York Infantry
46 Corrigan, James Union Engineers 15th Regiment, New York Engineers (New)
47 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 64th Regiment, New York Infantry
48 Corrigan, James Union Cavalry 2nd Regiment, US Dragoons (Regular Army)
49 Corrigan, James Union Cavalry 7th Regiment, Missouri State Militia Cavalry
50 Corrigan, James Union Cavalry 3rd Regiment, Missouri State Militia Cavalry (1st Organization)
51 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 110th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
52 Corrigan, James Union Engineers 50th Regiment, New York Engineers
53 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 87th Regiment, New York Infantry
54 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 79th Regiment, New York Infantry
55 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 74th Regiment, New York Infantry
56 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 73rd Regiment, New York Infantry
57 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 71st Regiment, New York Infantry
58 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 28th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry
59 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 5th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry
60 Corrigan, James Union Artillery Battery E, New Jersey Light Artillery
61 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 140th Regiment, New York Infantry
62 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 10th Regiment, New York Infantry
63 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 19th Regiment, Indiana Infantry
64 Corrigan, James Union Infantry 26th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry
65 Corrigan, James Union Artillery 1st Regiment, Michigan Light Artillery
66 Corrigan, James B. Union Infantry 2nd Regiment, Vermont Infantry
67 Corrigan, James K. Union 3rd Regiment, New York National Guard (30 days, 1863)
68 Corrigan, John Union Cavalry 1st Regiment, Vermont Cavalry
69 Corrigan, John Union Cavalry 4th Regiment, New York Cavalry
70 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 48th Regiment, New York Infantry
71 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 40th Regiment, New York Infantry
72 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 32nd Regiment, New York Infantry
73 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 26th Regiment, New York Infantry
74 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 24th Regiment, New York Infantry
75 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 176th Regiment, New York Infantry
76 Corrigan, John Union Cavalry 11th Regiment, New York Cavalry
77 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 35th Regiment, Indiana Infantry
78 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 42nd Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry (100 days, 1864) (Militia)
79 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 27th Company Unattached, Massachusetts Infantry
80 Corrigan, John Union Artillery 13th Independent Battery, Michigan Light Artillery
81 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 3rd Regiment, Maine Infantry
82 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 17th Regiment, Maine Infantry
83 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 182nd Regiment, Ohio Infantry
84 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 11th Regiment, Illinois Infantry (3 months, 1861)
85 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 136th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
86 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 111th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
87 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 82nd Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
88 Corrigan, John Union Artillery 3rd Regiment, Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery
89 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 88th Regiment, New York Infantry
90 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 6th Regiment, New York Infantry
91 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 159th Regiment, New York Infantry
92 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 147th Regiment, New York Infantry
93 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 12th Regiment, US Infantry (Regular Army)
94 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 13th Regiment, US Infantry (Regular Army)
95 Corrigan, John Union Signal Corps, US Volunteers
96 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 2nd Regiment, Kentucky Infantry
97 Corrigan, John Union Artillery Battery B, New Jersey Light Artillery
98 Corrigan, John Union Cavalry 3rd Regiment, New Jersey Cavalry
99 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 35th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
100 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 33rd Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
101 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 26th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
102 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 1st Regiment, New Jersey Infantry (3 months, 1861)
103 Corrigan, John Union Artillery 1st Regiment, Missouri Light Artillery
104 Corrigan, John Union 13th Regiment, New York State Militia (3 months, 1861)
105 Corrigan, John Union Infantry 183rd Regiment, Ohio Infantry
106 Corrigan, John G. Union Cavalry 4th Regiment, New York Cavalry
107 Corrigan, John S. Union Infantry 195th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry (100 days, 1861)
108 Corrigan, John W. Union Infantry 18th Regiment, Missouri Infantry
109 Corrigan, Joseph Union Infantry 16th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry
110 Corrigan, Joseph Union Infantry 26th Regiment, New York Infantry
111 Corrigan, Joseph Union Infantry 22nd Regiment, US Infantry (Regular Army)
112 Corrigan, Joseph Union Infantry 12th Regiment, US Infantry (Regular Army)
113 Corrigan, Joseph Union Artillery 6th Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery
114 Corrigan, Joseph Union Infantry 28th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
115 Corrigan, Joseph Union Artillery 13th Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery
116 Corrigan, Lawrence Union Infantry 46th Regiment, Indiana Infantry
117 Corrigan, Lawrence Union Infantry Varner’s Battalion, US Volunteer Infantry
118 Corrigan, M. Union Ordnance Department (Regular Army)
119 Corrigan, Mark Union Infantry 156th Regiment, New York Infantry
120 Corrigan, Mathew Union Infantry 44th Regiment, Illinois Infantry
121 Corrigan, Mathew Union Artillery Elgin Battery (5th Independent), Illinois Light Artillery
122 Corrigan, Michael Union Infantry 1st Regiment, District of Columbia Infantry
123 Corrigan, Michael Union Infantry 125th Regiment, New York Infantry
124 Corrigan, Michael Union Infantry 26th Regiment, New York Infantry
125 Corrigan, Michael Union Infantry 198th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
126 Corrigan, Michael Union Infantry 8th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
127 Corrigan, Michael Union Infantry 23rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry
128 Corrigan, Michael Union Artillery 7th Independent Battery, New York Light Artillery
129 Corrigan, Michael Union Infantry 6th Regiment, Ohio Infantry
130 Corrigan, Michael Union Infantry 18th Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry
131 Corrigan, Miles Union Infantry 19th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry
132 Corrigan, Morrus Union Artillery 3rd Regiment, US Artillery (Regular Army)
133 Corrigan, Nathaniel Union Cavalry 11th Regiment, Missouri Cavalry
134 Corrigan, Nicholas Union Cavalry 1st Regiment, Nebraska Cavalry
135 Corrigan, Owen Union Infantry 4th Regiment, New Hampshire Infantry
136 Corrigan, Owen Union Infantry 139th Regiment, New York Infantry
137 Corrigan, Owen Union US Army (Regular Army)
138 Corrigan, Owen Union Cavalry 2nd Regiment, US Dragoons (Regular Army)
139 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 149th Regiment, Indiana Infantry
140 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 11th Regiment, New York Infantry
141 Corrigan, Patrick Union Artillery 2nd Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery
142 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 37th Regiment, New York Infantry
143 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 90th Regiment, New York Infantry
144 Corrigan, Patrick Union 1st Battalion, Louisville Provost Guard, Kentucky Volunteers
145 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 11th Regiment, US Infantry (Regular Army)
146 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 4th Regiment, US Infantry (Regular Army)
147 Corrigan, Patrick Union Artillery 2nd Regiment, US Artillery (Regular Army)
148 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 5th Regiment, US Infantry (Regular Army)
149 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 4th Regiment, US Infantry (Regular Army)
150 Corrigan, Patrick Union Cavalry 11th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry
151 Corrigan, Patrick Union Unassigned Veteran Reserve Corps
152 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 34th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry
153 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 7th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
154 Corrigan, Patrick Union Cavalry 1st Regiment, New York Provisional Cavalry
155 Corrigan, Patrick Union Cavalry 10th Regiment, New York Cavalry
156 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 140th Regiment, New York Infantry
157 Corrigan, Patrick Union Infantry 158th Regiment, New York Infantry
158 Corrigan, Patrick J. Union Infantry 116th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
159 Corrigan, Patrick L. Union Infantry 82nd Regiment, New York Infantry
160 Corrigan, Peter Union Infantry 123rd Regiment, Ohio Infantry
161 Corrigan, Peter Union Artillery 1st Regiment, US Artillery (Regular Army)
162 Corrigan, Peter Union Infantry 46th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
163 Corrigan, Peter Union Infantry 174th Regiment, New York Infantry
164 Corrigan, Peter Union Infantry 163rd Regiment, New York Infantry
165 Corrigan, Philip Union Artillery 16th Independent Battery, New York Light Artillery
166 Corrigan, Richard Union Infantry 10th Regiment, New Hampshire Infantry
167 Corrigan, Robert Union Infantry 94th Regiment, New York Infantry
168 Corrigan, Robert Union Infantry 195th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry (100 days, 1861)
169 Corrigan, Robert Union Infantry 195th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry (1 year, 1864-1865)
170 Corrigan, Silas Union Infantry 146th Regiment, New York Infantry
171 Corrigan, Terence Union Infantry 2nd Battalion, District of Columbia Infantry (3 months, 1861)
172 Corrigan, Terence Union Infantry 158th Regiment, New York Infantry
173 Corrigan, Terrence Union Infantry 34th Regiment, New York Infantry
174 Corrigan, Terrence Union Cavalry 5th Regiment, US Cavalry (Regular Army)
175 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 1st Regiment, California Infantry
176 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 16th Regiment, Maine Infantry
177 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 39th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry
178 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 88th Regiment, Illinois Infantry
179 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 82nd Regiment, New York Infantry
180 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 6th Regiment, New York Infantry
181 Corrigan, Thomas Union 69th Regiment, New York State Militia
182 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 54th Regiment, New York Infantry
183 Corrigan, Thomas Union Cavalry 22nd Regiment, New York Cavalry
184 Corrigan, Thomas Union Cavalry 18th Regiment, New York Cavalry
185 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 189th Regiment, New York Infantry
186 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 187th Regiment, New York Infantry
187 Corrigan, Thomas Union Engineers 15th Regiment, New York Engineers (New)
188 Corrigan, Thomas Union Engineers 15th Regiment, New York Engineers
189 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 157th Regiment, New York Infantry
190 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 140th Regiment, New York Infantry
191 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 29th Regiment, Michigan Infantry
192 Corrigan, Thomas Union Cavalry 3rd Regiment, Rhode Island Cavalry
193 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 8th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
194 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 179th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry (Drafted Militia)
195 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 20th Regiment, Connecticut Infantry
196 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 12th Regiment, Rhode Island Infantry
197 Corrigan, Thomas Union Infantry 6th Regiment, Maine Infantry
198 Corrigan, Thomas H. Union Artillery 3rd Regiment, US Artillery (Regular Army)
199 Corrigan, Thomas M. Union Infantry 6th Regiment, Pennsylvania Reserve Infantry (35th Volunteers)
200 Corrigan, William Union Infantry 4th Regiment, California Infantry
201 Corrigan, William Union Infantry 39th Regiment, Illinois Infantry
202 Corrigan, William Union Infantry 37th Regiment, New York Infantry
203 Corrigan, William Union Cavalry 9th Regiment, New York Cavalry
204 Corrigan, William Union Artillery 1st Regiment, New York Light Artillery
205 Corrigan, William Union Infantry 11th Regiment, Indiana Infantry
206 Corrigan, William Union Artillery 14th Independent Battery, New York Light Artillery
207 Corrigan, William Union Infantry 7th Regiment, Maryland Infantry
208 Corrigan, William F. Union Infantry 32nd Regiment, Kentucky Infantry

 

Army:                          CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA 
Leader:                       Jefferson Davis
Commander:             General Robert E. Lee

No. Soldier Name Side Function Regiment / Company / Rank In-Out / Alternate Name / Notes
1 Corrigan, A. Confederate Infantry 48th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry
Co. E / Private – Private / E./Corrigan
2 Corrigan, E. Confederate Infantry 2nd Battalion, Mississippi Infantry
Co. E / Private – Private
3 Corrigan, E. Confederate Infantry 48th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry
Co. E / Private – Private
4 Corrigan, Edward J. Confederate Infantry 9th Regiment, Florida Infantry
Co. A / Private – Sargeant
5 Corrigan, James Confederate 1st Regiment, South Carolina Militia (Charleston Reserves)
Co. A / Private – Private
6 Corrigan, James N. Confederate Cavalry 20th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry
Co. C / Private – Private / James Caragan
7 Corrigan, John Confederate Artillery 1st Regiment, South Carolina Artillery
Co. B, I / Private – Private
8 Corrigan, Michael Confederate Infantry 1st Regiment, Georgia Infantry (Olmstead’s)
Co. E / Private – Private
9 Corrigan, Morris Confederate Infantry 13th Regiment, Arkansas Infantry
Co. A / Private – Private / Enlisted July 1, 1862 / Corinth MS Killed in action: Belmont, MO November 7, 1861
10 Corrigan, Owen Confederate Infantry 9th Regiment, Florida Infantry
Co. A / Private – Private / Died: March 26, 1864 Buried: Finn’s Point, New Jersey
11 Corrigan, P. Confederate Infantry 22nd Regiment, Mississippi Infantry
Co. I / Private – Private
12 Corrigan, P. M. Confederate Cavalry 3rd Regiment, South Carolina Cavalry
Co. H / Private – Private
13 Corrigan, P.J. Confederate Cavalry 28th Regiment, Mississippi Cavalry
Co. A / Private – Private
14 Corrigan, Peter Confederate Infantry D.J. Red’s Company, Mississippi Infantry (Red Rebels)
Private – Private
15 Corrigan, Sample Confederate Waul’s Texas Legion
Co. H / Private – Private
16 Corrigan, William Confederate Cavalry 15th Battalion, Arkansas Cavalry (Buster’s)
Co. D / Private – Private / Paroled June 8, 1865 at Shreveport, LA
17 Corrigan, William Confederate Cavalry Clarkson’s Battalion, Confederate Cavalry (Independent Rangers)
Co. H / Private – Private / William Carrigan

 

AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION
“Time will not dim the glory of their deeds” – General of the Armies John J. Pershing

The American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) was established by Congress in 1923 to commemorate the service, sacrifice and achievements of U.S. Armed Forces where they have served overseas since 1917, and within the U.S. when directed by public law.

The ABMC commemorative mission is reflected in 24 overseas military cemeteries that serve as resting places for almost 125,000 American War Dead; on Tablets of the Missing that memorialise more than 94,000 U.S. servicemen and women; and through 25 memorials, monuments and markers.

The Commission maintains several databases, including:

Those interred at the American World War I and World War II cemeteries overseas.

The Missing in Action from World War I and World War II who are memorialized on Tablets of the Missing within the cemeteries and on three memorials in the U.S.

Those killed worldwide during the Korean War.

The Commission also has listings of War Dead and veterans of the Mexican War, Civil War and Spanish-American War who are buried at the ABMC cemeteries in Corozal, Panama, and Mexico City.

WORLD WAR I
1914 – 1918


World War I – Monument

Of the 116,516 Americans that lost their lives during World War I, 30,921 are interred at our overseas American military cemeteries and 4,452 are commemorated on our Tablets of the Missing as missing in action, lost or buried at sea.  Below is a listing by cemetery showing the number buried and the number that were declared missing.

CEMETERY

BURIALS

MISSING

Aisne-Marne American Cemetery

2,289

1,060

Brookwood American Cemetery

468

563

Flanders Field American Cemetery

368

43

Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery

14,246

954

Oise-Aisne American Cemetery

6,012

241

Somme American Cemetery

1,844

333

St. Mihiel American Cemetery

4,153

284

Suresnes American Cemetery

1,541

974

TOTALS

30,921

4,452

CORRIGAN CASUALTIES

Name Rank / Service / Internment Awards
Andrew B. Corrigan Private First Class, U.S. Army
138th Infantry Regiment, 35h Infantry Division
Entered the Service from: Missouri
Died: September 26, 1918
Buried at: Plot B Row 26 Grave 22
Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery
Romagne, France
Charles J. Corrigan Private, U.S. Army
80th Field Artillery Regiment, 7th Infantry DivisionEntered the Service from: Pennsylvania
Died: September 30, 1918
Buried at: Plot A Row 24 Grave 9
Oise-Aisne American Cemetery
Fere-en-Tardenois, France
Fritts D. Corrigan Private, U.S. Army
28th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
Entered the Service from: Kentucky
Died: May 28, 1918
Buried at: Plot D Row 4 Grave 2
Somme American Cemetery
Bony, France
John P. Corrigan Private First Class, U.S. Army
114th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division
Entered the Service from: Texas
Died: October 12, 1918
Buried at: Plot G Row 34 Grave 4
Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery
Romagne, France

WORLD WAR II
1939 – 1945

The World War II Memorial honors the 16 million who served in the armed forces of the U.S., the more than 400,000 who died, and all who supported the war effort from home. Symbolic of the defining event of the 20th Century, the memorial is a monument to the spirit, sacrifice, and commitment of the American people. The Second World War is the only 20th Century event commemorated on the National Mall’s central axis.


World War II Memorial

CORRIGAN CASUALTIES

Name Rank / Service / Internment Awards
Charles F. Corrigan Private First Class, U.S. Army
Service # 32908986
105th Infantry Regiment, 27th Infantry Division
Entered the Service from: New York
Died: 12-Jul-44
Buried at: Plot B Row 0 Grave 850
Honolulu Memorial
Honolulu, Hawaii
Bronze Star
Purple Heart
David W. Corrigan Private, U.S. Army
Service # 16133432
259th Infantry Regiment, 65th Infantry DivisionEntered the Service from: Wisconsin
Died: 6-Apr-45
Buried at: Plot B Row 13 Grave 21
Netherlands American Cemetery
Margraten, Netherlands
Purple Heart
Edmund F. Corrigan Private First Class, U.S. Army
Service # 31004311
318th Infantry Regiment, 80th Infantry Division
Entered the Service from: Massachusetts
Died: 15-Mar-45
Buried at: Plot H Row 4 Grave 79
Luxembourg American Cemetery
Luxembourg City, Luxembourg
Purple Heart
Edward Corrigan Technical Sergeant, U.S. Army Air Forces
Service # 11030809
323rd Bomber Squadron, 91st Bomber Group, Heavy
Entered the Service from: Massachusetts
Died: 4-Mar-43
Buried at: Plot B Row 34 Grave 41
Ardennes American Cemetery
Neupre, Belgium
Air Medal
Purple Heart
Emmett T. Corrigan First Lieutenant, U.S. Army
Service # O1823568
507th Parachute Infantry Regt, 17th Airborne Division
Entered the Service from: New York
Died: 24-Mar-45
Buried at: Plot K Row 12 Grave 21
Netherlands American Cemetery
Margraten, Netherlands
Purple Heart
Gardiner A. Corrigan Technical Sergeant, U.S. Army Air Forces
Service # 13047732
63rd Bomber Squadron, 43rd Bomber Group, Heavy
Entered the Service from: Pennsylvania
Died: 24-Jan-46
Missing in Action or Buried at Sea
Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery
Manila, Philippines
Purple Heart
George W. Corrigan Seaman, Second Class, U.S. Navy
Service # 2247101
United States Navy
Entered the Service from: New Jersey
Died: 12-Oct-42
Missing in Action or Buried at Sea
Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery
Manila, Philippines
Purple Heart
Gerald Raymond Corrigan Quartermaster, Chief, U.S. Navy
Service # 1227345
United States Naval Reserve
Entered the Service from: Minnesota
Died: 28-Jul-42
Buried at: Plot M Row 1 Grave 143
Honolulu Memorial
Honolulu, Hawaii
James Thomas Corrigan Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Service # 395357
United States Marine Corps
Entered the Service from: Ohio
Died: 30-Jul-44
Buried at: Plot N Row 0 Grave 472
Honolulu Memorial
Honolulu, Hawaii
Purple Heart
John A. Corrigan Private, U.S. Army
Service # 32691576
6th Replacement DepotEntered the Service from: New York
Died: 21-Jul-43
Missing in Action or Buried at Sea
Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial
Honolulu, Hawaii
Joseph L. Corrigan, Jr. Flight Officer, U.S. Army Air Forces
Service # T-126753
331st Bomber Squadron, 94th Bomber Group, Heavy
Entered the Service from: Massachusetts
Died: 7-Oct-44
Buried at: Plot B Row 34 Grave 14
Ardennes American Cemetery
Neupre, Belgium
Air Medal, Purple Heart
Leo J. Corrigan Fireman, Third Class, U.S. Navy
Service # 6535168
United States Naval Reserve
Entered the Service from: Pennsylvania
Died: 3-Jan-44
Missing in Action or Buried at Sea
Tablets of the Missing at East Coast Memorial
New York City, USA
Raymond P. Corrigan Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Forces
Service # 0-743419
433rd Fighter Squadron, 475th Fighter GroupEntered the Service from: Iowa
Died: 24-Sep-43
Missing in Action or Buried at Sea
Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery
Manila, Philippines
Air Medal
Purple Heart
Richard A. Corrigan Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Forces
Service # 0-821458
41st Fighter Squadron, 35th Fighter Group
Entered the Service from: New York
Died: 19-Oct-44
Missing in Action or Buried at Sea
Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery
Manila, Philippines
Air Medal
Purple Heart
William H. Corrigan, Jr. Motor Machinist’s Mate, Third Class, U.S. Navy
Service # 7578275
United States Naval Reserve
Entered the Service from: Minnesota
Died: 11-Feb-45
Missing in Action or Buried at Sea
Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery
Manila, Philippines
Purple Heart

Cemetery and Memorial Abbreviations:

AR-Ardennes EP-Epinal LO-Lorraine NO-Normandy
BR-Brittany FL-Florence LX-Luxembourg NO-North Africa
CA-Cambridge HC-Henri-Chapelle ML-Manila RH-Rhone
EC-East coast Memorial HN-Honolulu Memorial NE-Netherlands SR-Sicily-Rome
WC-West Coast Memorial

 

KOREAN WAR
1950 – 1953

OUR NATION HONORS HER SONS AND DAUGHTERS
WHO ANSWERED THE CALL TO DEFEND A COUNTRY
THEY NEVER KNEW AND A PEOPLE THEY NEVER MET
Dedication Stone


Korean War Veterans Memorail

The Department of Defense reports that 54,246 American service men and women lost their lives during the Korean War. This includes all losses world wide. Since the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. honors all U.S. Military who lost their lives during the War, we have tried to obtain the names of those who died in other areas besides Korea during the period June 27, 1950 to July 27, 1954, one year after the Korean Armistice. Accessible electronically at the memorial is a Honor Roll database where all 54,246 should be listed. Unfortunately, a fire at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri destroyed many of the records of service personnel and a complete listing is not available. To date, the database includes the names of nearly 39,000 service men and women who died during that period, including the 8,196 missing that are listed on our Honolulu Memorial.

As there has been no peace treaty, Americans who lost their lives in the Demilitarized Zone of Korea since the Armistice have been included. The 8,196 Americans who were Missing in Action or lost or buried at sea and commemorated at the Honolulu Memorial are included in the database at the Korean War Veterans Memorial.

The curb running along the northern side of the statues contains an alphabetical listing of the 22 nations that participated in the Korean War.  Seventeen nations provided combat units and five medical supports.  As the curb extends into the circular pool it has inscribed the following:

Killed in Action Missing in Action Prisoners of War Wounded in Action
U.S.A.

54,246

8,177

7,140

103,284

U.N.

627,246

469,267

92,770

1,060,453

CORRIGAN CASUALTIES

Name Rank / Service / Internment Awards
Frank Corrigan Cook, Illinois
Born 1932
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Service Number 16310072
Missing in Action – Presumed Dead
Died February 15, 1951 in Korea
Private First Class Corrigan was a member of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. He was listed as Missing in Action while fighting the enemy near Chipyong-ni, South Korea on February 15, 1951. He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953.
Private First Class Corrigan was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
Herbert Leo Corrigan, Jr. Waterville, Maine
Born February 15, 1933
Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps
Service Number 1199955
Killed in Action
Died April 17, 1952 in Korea
Private First Class Corrigan was a member of Headquarters and Service Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in Korea on April 17, 1952.
Private First Class Corrigan was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
Thomas Francis Corrigan Mechanicville, New York
Born December 2, 1932
Private, U.S. Marine Corps
Service Number
Non-hostile Death
Died September 23, 1951 in United States
Private Corrigan was a member of the 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in North Korea on October 21, 1951.
Private Corrigan was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

 

VIETNAM WAR
1955 – 1975

  
The Wall

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial serves as a testament to the sacrifice of American military personnel during one of this nation’s least popular wars. The memorial consists of three distinct sections. “the wall”, the three service men statue and flagpole and the women in service to the Vietnam war statue. The purpose of this memorial is to separate the issue of the sacrifices of the veterans from the U.S. policy in the war, thereby creating a venue for reconciliation.

The Vietnam War (1955–75), was a protracted and unsuccessful effort by South Vietnam and the United States to prevent the communists of North Vietnam from uniting South Vietnam with North Vietnam under their leadership.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., known simply as ‘The Wall’, and was built in Constitution Gardens in Washington, D.C., through private donations from the public, and dedicated in 1982.

Also, standing near ‘The Wall’ is the Vietnam Women’s Memorial and honours the military and civilian women who served and sacrificed during the Vietnam War, and was dedicated over Veterans Day weekend on November 19-12, 1993.  Some of their names are with their brothers’ on ‘The Wall.’

CORRIGAN COMBATENTS

Name Details
CORRIGAN, Michael Joseph Sargeant – E5 – Army – Regular
101st Airborne Division
21 year old Single, Caucasian, Male
Born on Dec 25, 1946
From BURBANK, CALIFORNIA
Length of service 2 years.
His tour of duty began on Nov 12, 1966
Casualty was on Oct 04, 1968 in THUA THIEN, SOUTH VIETNAM
Body was recovered
Religion – ROMAN CATHOLIC
Panel 41W – – Line 4
CORRIGAN, Danny Joseph Corporal – E4 – Army – Selective Service
25th Infantry Division
19 year old Single, Caucasian, Male
Born on Oct 16, 1947
From LANSING, ILLINOIS
His tour of duty began on Mar 24, 1967
Casualty was on Aug 20, 1967 in BINH DUONG, SOUTH VIETNAM
Body was recovered
Religion – METHODIST
Panel 25E – – Line 19